Entries by Ulf Brunnbauer

Impressions from the Workshop “Unbuilding binaries: Exploring affective and analytical responses to binary divisions as encountered in the field”

How can binaries be effectively unbuilt? How does this impact constructions of identity, conceptual frameworks and scholarly fields? These are some questions explored by the graduate researcher team behind the workshop “Unbuilding binaries”

Deutschland-Analysen: seeing Germany from inside and outside. An interview with Marcus Hahn and Frederic Ponten by Tamara Heger

Must Germany be studied as a nation-state? Or could it be viewed as an area, through lenses positioned on the inside and outside? How does the Nazi past affect the analytical and conceptual frameworks open to researchers today? Marcus Hahn and Frederic Ponten discuss their efforts to reconfigure German studies as transregional or trans-imperial area studies with Tamara Heger.

We will be alright. Some encouragement for those in the starting gates and those who will be

In this thought-provoking text, Jana Stöxen reflects on her experiences of developing her research topic for her master’s thesis. She explores the social, disciplinary and material barriers she faced before outlining how she overcame them to produce an innovative piece of research. Her words offer encouragement to her peers – and others – who might be struggling with similar challenges.

Post-socialism in Passing: Impressions from field research conducted off the beaten track | Postsozialismus im Vorbeigehen: Eindrücke einer Feldforschung abseits der großen Straßen

Jana Stöxen, winner of the inaugural Regensburg Prize for Prize for Outstanding Master’s Theses, presents a photo essay based on her ethnographic field research conducted in Bucharest. She traced the ways post-socialism forms part of everyday life, shaping the community in a block of flats in the Berceni district of the Romanian capital. The texts are in English and German.

The Post-Dialogic Imagination: Brexit Friction, Brexit Fiction

Dirk Wiemann explores recent British fiction, including the works of Jonathan Coe and Ali Smith, to consider how novels have approached Brexit and its impact on the ability to conduct dialogue and form national imaginaries. Adopting a Bakhtinian lens, he considers the ways novels negotiate the polarized agonism that threatens to undo social cohesion with models of meaning-making rendered ineffective in new conditions.